Sunday, 10 October 2010

Don't Look Back Into The Sun

I noticed this earlier today.


The glazing on this loco, a Bachmann Class 47, has gained a rather milky appearance. It was an impulse purchase at the start of the year and has been on the window sill in my workshop for some time and, even in Yorkshire, has been exposed to sunlight. Now, it's not always a good idea to leave a lot of things in direct sunlight but what worries me is that even in the 'railway room' at my parents' this could happen very easily.

Being a normal room, many of the models could easily be exposed to sunlight through a window at the side of the room - it may not be as extreme as the duff here but the effect could still be very disappointing for people. Many plastics don't take kindly to UV light and I suspect that this is the case here. I would be replacing the glazing anyway, but that's not really the point. And it has made me wonder about the stability of materials used - the last thing any modellers would want to find would be that a model which has taken many hours to construct was ruined something like this. Just something to bear in mind.

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Don't Look Back Into The Sun

2 comments:

  1. James thanks for pointing out this problem. I have a Class 47 and living in sunny Brisbane, Australia, I would say that the Sun issue would be far more destructive! Greg

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  2. Strong sunlight can affect all sorts of things I think - some scenic finishes most definitely 'bleach' in the sun.

    I suppose we must close the curtains and blinds.

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